Block(ing) Party

I have knitted several Christmas gifts but had not yet blocked them – as usual, putting off the not-as-fun part of the knitting.  Blocking involves soaking your knitted item in cool water with a wool wash soap for about half an hour to allow the water to penetrate all the fibers, plump them up, even them out and relax them.   Then, you squeeze out the water and lay it flat to dry, sometimes having to pin the item into a certain shape.

But I finally bit the bullet, decided to do them all at once, and gave them the plunge:

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And laid them out to dry:

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Now they are ready to wrap up and deliver!  After that not-as-fun task was done, I assembled a bunch of knitted items to sell at The Spinning Room for the holidays.  Of course, I forgot to take a picture of that, but if you are local and are interested in buying some handknitted items for the holidays, my items will be there as well as items from the other ladies who work and/or teach at the shop!

In other news, it was a busy week with the Doodlebugs.  There was lots of outside playing (even though it was chilly, we ran around a lot to keep warm!) along with some sorting:

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Glue, construction paper, crayons and tape:

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Making a book road:

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Then reading the book road:

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Busy weekend ahead with three knitting classes to teach!  Hopefully, I’ll be organized enough to show you some pictures on Monday….

4 comments on “Block(ing) Party
  1. Libby says:

    Nice party. Awaiting details – when the timing is right – on those beautiful gifts. The Doods are well and truly looked after! A road of books – cute!

  2. Annette Eisenstein says:

    do you block cotton projects, just finished a cotton shawl
    Thanks

    • lizytish says:

      Yes, you can block cotton projects! Just remember that when cotton gets stretched, it stays stretched until you wash it again. So, when you take it out of the soaking water, don’t let it hang and sag. You want to be the one to control what shape the shawl turns into, not the heavy water that’s in the fabric.

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